{"__v":0,"_id":"55fa118917b9d00d00969e5d","category":{"__v":2,"_id":"55fa03180e1f1f1700a1f6ce","pages":["55fa0a1fd6f4370d001d99d2","55fa118917b9d00d00969e5d"],"project":"545a65231d018b1400227d8f","version":"54e431e6de9f5b2300fc6dbc","sync":{"url":"","isSync":false},"reference":false,"createdAt":"2015-09-17T00:02:32.215Z","from_sync":false,"order":1,"slug":"data-structures","title":"Data structures"},"project":"545a65231d018b1400227d8f","user":"545a64cfbf1d2b0e00aaa091","version":{"__v":10,"_id":"54e431e6de9f5b2300fc6dbc","forked_from":"545a65231d018b1400227d92","project":"545a65231d018b1400227d8f","createdAt":"2015-02-18T06:32:06.531Z","releaseDate":"2015-02-18T06:32:06.531Z","categories":["54e431e7de9f5b2300fc6dbd","54e431e7de9f5b2300fc6dbe","54e56a85c2f66835000133c3","54ff948548c94d23004f1e17","5527280be69c7d0d00047eaf","55273bb14a7ac121004c60f0","55274588975eef3700ca8077","552748df9d4bcd2300d0383d","55274dd79d4bcd2300d0384a","55fa03180e1f1f1700a1f6ce","55fa3172d6f4370d001d99fd"],"is_deprecated":false,"is_hidden":false,"is_beta":true,"is_stable":true,"codename":"","version_clean":"2.0.0","version":"2"},"updates":[],"next":{"pages":[],"description":""},"createdAt":"2015-09-17T01:04:09.722Z","link_external":false,"link_url":"","githubsync":"","sync_unique":"","hidden":false,"api":{"results":{"codes":[]},"settings":"","auth":"required","params":[],"url":""},"isReference":false,"order":0,"body":"To make sense of the API it helps (a lot) if you understand how the plumbing in Attendly works. People have used Attendlys API to do all sorts of crazy things, from running massive events, to a virtual cat world (seriously).\n\n\n[block:callout]\n{\n  \"type\": \"info\",\n  \"title\": \"The Event data structure is the key to understanding the API\"\n}\n[/block]\nWhen running an event, all of the data structures are associated back to the event data structure. The event data structure controls the name, the timing and the status of the event.\n\nYou can have multiple tickets associated with an event. Tickets can be free, cost money, have earlybird prices/dates. Every event needs at least one ticket. If you don't want to show the ticket interface, you can make a hidden ticket for the event which is automatically assigned to the attendees and is hidden entirely from the interface. This makes Attendly behave in a way like a online form. Especially once you hide the event details etc.\n\nIf you add an address to the event, we will show the address within the events details. You can even select to show a google map of where the events address is. Adding an address to an event is optional.\n\nAttendly events come with a default theme which looks pretty great. You can however play with the theme to create something that better represents your event or brand. The event editor in the admin interface allows some customisation, however the API allows a lot more. If you want we can even add CSS at an account level so that all your events inherit some base CSS. Contact us to talk about this. We can also add custom javascript to your events (generally or on a page by page basis) - let us know if you are interested in this.\n\nFields (or widgets) are the items the attendees have to fill in to register. The default and required fields for EVERY event are: \n- First name\n- Surname\n- Email\n- Terms and conditions (a checkbox)\n\nYou can of course create as many other fields as you like. There are lots of different types of fields, including the standard:\n- text field\n- text area\n- dropdown\n- radio buttons\n- checkboxes\n- headings\n- paragraphs\n[block:callout]\n{\n  \"type\": \"info\",\n  \"title\": \"Let us know if you can't work out a good solution to getting attendee data\",\n  \"body\": \"We may have a solution or be able to build it into the product.\"\n}\n[/block]\nWe also have a number of secret widgets that do all sorts of crazy things. If you have a requirement which the default widgets don't quite match, let us know. There is a good chance we have something that will do what you want.\n\nOnce you have sold some tickets you will have some attendees. You can grab the attendees via the API. If you want to have an always updated list of your attendees you could use the API, but webhooks might work better for what you want.\n\nThis is just a quick intro to how Attendly works. We also have fundraising, donations, teams and a host of other features. If you ever want to know **how** or **if**, please contact us.","excerpt":"Understanding how the data all fits together will make using the API a lot easier","slug":"overview","type":"basic","title":"Overview"}

Overview

Understanding how the data all fits together will make using the API a lot easier

To make sense of the API it helps (a lot) if you understand how the plumbing in Attendly works. People have used Attendlys API to do all sorts of crazy things, from running massive events, to a virtual cat world (seriously). [block:callout] { "type": "info", "title": "The Event data structure is the key to understanding the API" } [/block] When running an event, all of the data structures are associated back to the event data structure. The event data structure controls the name, the timing and the status of the event. You can have multiple tickets associated with an event. Tickets can be free, cost money, have earlybird prices/dates. Every event needs at least one ticket. If you don't want to show the ticket interface, you can make a hidden ticket for the event which is automatically assigned to the attendees and is hidden entirely from the interface. This makes Attendly behave in a way like a online form. Especially once you hide the event details etc. If you add an address to the event, we will show the address within the events details. You can even select to show a google map of where the events address is. Adding an address to an event is optional. Attendly events come with a default theme which looks pretty great. You can however play with the theme to create something that better represents your event or brand. The event editor in the admin interface allows some customisation, however the API allows a lot more. If you want we can even add CSS at an account level so that all your events inherit some base CSS. Contact us to talk about this. We can also add custom javascript to your events (generally or on a page by page basis) - let us know if you are interested in this. Fields (or widgets) are the items the attendees have to fill in to register. The default and required fields for EVERY event are: - First name - Surname - Email - Terms and conditions (a checkbox) You can of course create as many other fields as you like. There are lots of different types of fields, including the standard: - text field - text area - dropdown - radio buttons - checkboxes - headings - paragraphs [block:callout] { "type": "info", "title": "Let us know if you can't work out a good solution to getting attendee data", "body": "We may have a solution or be able to build it into the product." } [/block] We also have a number of secret widgets that do all sorts of crazy things. If you have a requirement which the default widgets don't quite match, let us know. There is a good chance we have something that will do what you want. Once you have sold some tickets you will have some attendees. You can grab the attendees via the API. If you want to have an always updated list of your attendees you could use the API, but webhooks might work better for what you want. This is just a quick intro to how Attendly works. We also have fundraising, donations, teams and a host of other features. If you ever want to know **how** or **if**, please contact us.